Marine Raphanel Redon (PhD student)

Vision Institute
Aging in Vision and Action Lab
CNRS – INSERM – Sorbonne Université
17, rue Moreau F-75012 Paris, France

 

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Research interests:
In France, visual impairment affects 1.7 million people. Very strongly related to the age, the prevalence is likely to increase in the coming years. In clinical routine, only 15% of visually impaired are addressed to low vision professional. Two observations are relevant: first the readaptative techniques vary from one practitioner to another. Second, for a given technique, there are interpersonal variabilities concerning its effectiveness. This variability continues even when residual vision of patients is comparable. My research will study the various clinical factors and neurocognitive factors predicting the success of a low vision rehabilitation. The main goal is the care improvement of visual impaired patients, their autonomy and their quality of life. To do so, we’ll investigate a VR-based readaptation process and will use fMRI and other neuroimaging techniques to assess the effectiveness of this readaptation.

Short bio:
I have a Master degree in clinical research in readaptation. I am above all a healthcare professional specialized in the vision (optician, orthoptist and optometrist). I did these jobs throughout University. These experiences sensibilized me to low vision questions. For these reasons, and thanks to the support by the IUIS Sorbonne Universités, I’m currently pursuing my PhD thesis at the Institut de la Vision and the CHNO des Quinze-Vingts.

Keywords:
Visual aging, low vision, orthoptics, optometry, ophthalmology, fMRI, readaptation, virtual reality, rehabilitation, visual impairment.

CV (pdf): [ download ]

Publications

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2018

  1. Raphanel M, Shaughness G, H. Seiple W and Arleo A (2018) Current Practice in Low Vision Rehabilitation of Age-related Macular Degeneration and Usefulness of Virtual Reality as a Rehabilitation Tool. Journal of Aging Science, 6(2):1-12.